Brisket?

smoking Polock

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In another thread I mentioned that the first and only brisket I did turned out like an old leather boot. It was pretty tough! Just wondering if anyone out there has a recipe and technique to doing a brisket on the Pit Boss.

I didn't do much with mine. Trimmed off a little fat and seasoned it with Montreal Steak Rub (McCormick). Smoked it slow for 6 hours and then cranked up the heat until the internal temp was 205.

I am wondering if it would turn out better if I put it in a marinade for a few hours or even a day and then smoke it longer than 6 hours.

I have a series 7 smoker. Trim excess fat. Liberally salt and pepper. Wrap and let set over night in frig. Start smoker on 350° heat up and select the smoke setting. I smoked for three hours, cooked at 200° for three hours, cooked at 250° for three hours and removed. Wrap with foil or butcher paper and put back in fat side up for 5 hours and forget about. Take out and let sit 30 minutes. Note during cooking, I spray 50/50 mix of 100% apple juice and apple cider vinegar every hour until wrapped.

See below for final results of my first time smoking a brisket. Hope this is helpful.

Chester
Tinley Park, IL

Brisket.jpg
 

bellegirl

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In another thread I mentioned that the first and only brisket I did turned out like an old leather boot. It was pretty tough! Just wondering if anyone out there has a recipe and technique to doing a brisket on the Pit Boss.

I didn't do much with mine. Trimmed off a little fat and seasoned it with Montreal Steak Rub (). Smoked it slow for 6 hours and then cranked up the heat until the internal temp was 205.

I am wondering if it would turn out better if I put it in a marinade for a few hours or even a day and then smoke it longer than 6 hours.

I just smoked a 19 pound on P-5 for 14 hours but my pellets ran out so I had to start again. At this point the internal temperature was about 125. I restarted the grill and put the setting on P-4. The internal temperature did not reach 195 until around 6 pm. I decided to leave it on the pit for 1 more hour. When I took it off the grill I let it rest for 1 hour wrapped it in plastic with a towel. When I did cut it against the grain it was tender and stayed together. It is useful fir you to know I brined this brisket in salt water for 19 ho per pound buturs. As soon as I removed it from the brim I seasoned it and let it set for an hours to get closer to room temperature before i placed it on the pit. Even though it was tender it was not as good as I would like. It did have a small smoke ring and had good flavor. This was the first time I used my Pit Boss and learned a lot. Next time I will set the pit on P-3 and leave it, this is good for my pit but I suggest you fine tune your pit. I used one cup of salt for each gallon of water in the brin and one hour for each pound of brisket. I planned to leave it on the pit for one hour per pound but since my pellets ran out it stayed longer. Even though goggle says the brisket is done at 195 degrees I have found leaving it on until internal temperature reached 210 degrees it is more tender. I suggest you experiment and keep notes on what you do to make the proper changes as required.
 

bellegirl

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I have a series 7 smoker. Trim excess fat. Liberally salt and pepper. Wrap and let set over night in frig. Start smoker on 350° heat up and select the smoke setting. I smoked for three hours, cooked at 200° for three hours, cooked at 250° for three hours and removed. Wrap with foil or butcher paper and put back in fat side up for 5 hours and forget about. Take out and let sit 30 minutes. Note during cooking, I spray 50/50 mix of 100% apple juice and apple cider vinegar every hour until wrapped.

See below for final results of my first time smoking a brisket. Hope this is helpful.

Chester
Tinley Park, IL

View attachment 433
Great looking smoke ring
 

Boone

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I smoke whole packer briskets. Inject with beef stock and season the night before. Smoke at the 220 setting since my smoker is a bit hotter than what I set the temperature setting at. When internal temperature reaches the 160 - 165 range I wrap tightly in foil and then back on the smoker until the internal temperature reaches 200 degrees at which time I start checking every half hour for tenderness. Mine are usually probe tender anywhere from 203 to 207 degrees internal. A couple degrees can make a big difference for it to be done. After I find it probe tender and it passes the jiggle test I remove it from the smoker .. still wrapped in foil .. and place it in a cooler wrapped in towels for 1 to 2 hours. Once you get the feel for what it should feel like when you probe for tenderness you will .. most times .. end up with a brisket that is pull apart tender.

Takes practice! I had my share of tough and or dry brisket in my learning days.
 

Billk1

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I have an 1100. Trim the fat and season with a basic rub (light on the salt). I inject beef broth and worcestershire into the meat. Wrap in foil and refrigerate overnight. Use oak pellets and smoke at 225 for 10 to 12 hrs. Place meat directly on the grill, fat side up and meat temp should be 190 to 200. Wrap in foil for aprox 1 hour. Get a lot of compliments each time.
 

Blackpcka

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In another thread I mentioned that the first and only brisket I did turned out like an old leather boot. It was pretty tough! Just wondering if anyone out there has a recipe and technique to doing a brisket on the Pit Boss.

I didn't do much with mine. Trimmed off a little fat and seasoned it with Montreal Steak Rub (McCormick). Smoked it slow for 6 hours and then cranked up the heat until the internal temp was 205.

I am wondering if it would turn out better if I put it in a marinade for a few hours or even a day and then smoke it longer than 6 hours.

I have done 15 to 20 briskets in my Pit Boss Austin XL pellet smoker. I have used different rubs but I have also injected every single one of them with a mixture of beef broth and Worcestershire sauce. I do not believe the injection does much for the tenderness, But I cook the brisket at 225° until the internal temperature reaches about 165 to 170 and the color looks good on the outside, and then I wrap it in tinfoil with a little bit of the injection broth in the foil wrap. Then I place back on the smoker at 225° until the internal temperature reaches 203°. At that time remove the brisket and place it in a dry cooler, wrapped in towels, for at least one hour, and I have left it in there for up to 3hrs. My briskets have always turned out very tender and juicy.
 

Rever

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I will wrap my Flat with Butter often as Flats have little amount of fat. With Brisket I can tell steady temps are important as briskets do no like large swings.
Brisket.jpg
 

Batt4Christ

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Brisket really is simple. Consistent low heat (205-225 is low). I have done them with wrapping and not wrapped. Not a massive difference in end result- just in total
Cooking time.

a tender brisket comes when you don’t dry it out, and when you get the internal temp up to between 202-205. But each brisket is unique, so instead of a thermometer temperature, I use the probe as a tender meter—- if it inserts like softened butter (minimal resistance), it’s ready to come out.
Yes, resting is important, but that is more about the juices getting redistributed and not lost with cutting.
Don’t cook below 200 degrees. And don’t get in a hurry. 12 hours isn’t unusual for a whole brisket- and it
Can take much longer than that.
 

DozerofDoom

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So I smoked a 17 lb. brisket on my KC combo for 16 hours at 225 and it turned out AMAZING. I just used the Pitboss Competition smoked and the Pitboss original beef and brisket seasoning and a little black pepper. Fat cap down right in the middle. Didnt wrap it just checked it after 8 hours when I woke up in the morning. I did wrap it and let it rest in a cooler after I took it off for about 2 hours.
 

DaveXDm9

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Interesting...never would have guessed that.

You can use Morton Tender Quick which you can pick up at your local grocery store or FAB (meat enhancer) as people call it pink salt. A lot of guys in the BBQ competition use Morton Tender Quick as it does not change the taste or overruns your rub.

This chemical reaction is similar to the one that occurs when you cure meat by sprinkling it with a curing salt containing sodium nitrite. These are the salts that give bacon, hot dogs, and corned beef their characteristic pink color. They lock in the pink color. Sprinkle a little on meat and voila, smoke ring.

If you want a solid smoke ring without using enhancers spray your brisket, pork butt or ribs with apple juice every 30 minutes this will enhance your smoke ring as well. When smoke roasting, moist meat holds onto smoke more readily than dry meat. Less smoke sticks as the cooking continues because the surface of the meat begins to dry. For this reason putting a pan of water in a smoker helps create a smoke ring because the evaporating water condenses on the meat.
 
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Popy

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Y’all are putting your brisket in a cooler and not wrapping in foil
 

Inscrutable

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Final results. It was better than the last one but still not great. Not a lot of bend. It will take some practice I guess. Started at 7:30am and it hit 207 at about 2:15 pm. I let it rest in a cooler for 2 hours. Good bark, juicy but a tad tough. Myron Mixon would've hated it. But my wife and kids liked it.
Small flats maybe the hardest thing especially for us lesser experienced. Usually trimmed down to the meat and very little fat. If you can swing the $$$ it’s better to start with a full packer and do the separating/trimming yourself.

A tough brisket is UNDERcooked (collagen not broken down) ... overcooked is dry and crumbly.

You can’t rely on IT alone (as a couple here have said). IT is a starting point for testing for tenderness. Want to be probe-tender all over. Injecting helps. In a pan with a little liquid helps. Can work wrapped or not wrapped.

Riding the steepest learning curve, but try to enjoy the ride!
 

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